I say all the time that “bread shouldn’t be boring”, and this is a perfect example of that. This recipe makes two loaves, so not only is it absolutely delicious, but it’s a “work smarter not harder” way to make sourdough bread. This loaf is stuffed with roasted garlic, green olives, and is the total package when it comes to perfectly savory sourdough.

❤️ Why You’ll Love Roasted Garlic and Olive Loaf

I don’t often make my special stuffed sourdough loaf recipes in a way that makes two loaves, but I think it’s such a great way to make bread, and I had to share it with you.

Here are a couple reasons why you should prep a double batch of sourdough – 1. You can bake both loaves at the same time and gift bread to make someone’s day. (At the time I made this, I gave the other loaf to my mom) OR, 2. You can leave one loaf in the fridge for up to three days, so you can enjoy it later in the week without going through the prep process again.

Also – IT’S DELCIOUS. So, there’s that.

🍲 Ingredients

Sourdough Starter – Bubbly, active, sourdough starter that’s been fed 4 – 8 hours prior to using. I like to feed my starter a 1:3:3 ratio. (EX: 50g starter + 150g flour + 150g water)

Water – Filtered, room temperature water.

Flour – Unbleached all-purpose flour.

Roasted Garlic – 25 – 30 garlic cloves that have been covered in olive oil and roasted low and slow in the oven for 1-2 hours.

Olives – I like pitted green olives but use what you like best, or what you have on hand.

Salt – I always use pink Himalayan salt.

Garlic oil – the oil that you used to cover and roast the garlic cloves in.

👩‍🍳 How to Make Roasted Garlic and Olive Loaf

  • In the morning, feed your sourdough starter.

Prepping the Garlic

  • In the afternoon, a couple hours before you assemble your dough, roast your garlic. Preheat your oven to 275 degrees. Transfer your garlic cloves into a small oven safe dish and pour in olive oil until the garlic cloves are just covered.
  • Roast in the oven for one hour, if you like a darker more fragrant garlic you can roast them for up to two hours but make sure they don’t burn!. When the garlic is done roasting, let it cool completely while you assemble the dough.

Assemble your Dough

  • Mix together your bubbly starter and water until the starter has completely dissolved until there is a milky liquid. Add in your flour, oil from the roasted garlic, salt, and mix until a shaggy dough forms. Cover and let rest for one hour.
  • After resting, work your dough into a semi – smooth ball by pulling the sides of the dough up and towards the middle, rotating the bowl each time. Cover and let rest for one hour.
  • Perform 2 -3 more stretch and folds, every 30 minutes to one hour apart.
  • On your last stretch and fold, laminate your dough by transferring it to a slightly floured surface and stretching it into a large rectangle as far as you can without tearing the dough.
  • Evenly distribute 3/4 of the garlic and olives over the entire surface of the dough. Fold the edges of the dough towards the center, add the remaining garlic and olives over the folds, brig it all together by shaping the dough into a ball. Transfer the dough back into your bowl and cover with a damp bowl cover or tea towel. Leave the dough to bulk ferment on the counter overnight.

The Next Morning

  • Turn the dough over onto a lightly floured surface. Split into two equal sized pieces and shape to the proper size of your banneton. (Boule = round shape, Batard = oval shape). Place seam side up in your floured banneton, cover with plastic wrap and place into your fridge for at least two hours or up to three days.

Baking

  • When you’re ready to bake your dough, preheat your Dutch oven at 450 degrees for at least 20 minutes.
  • Turn your dough over onto a bread mat or piece of parchment paper. Using a sharp razor, score the top of your dough by making one large slash down the middle from the top of the dough, all the way to the bottom.
  • Carefully place the dough into a hot, preheated Dutch oven. Cover with the lid and bake for 23 minutes. Remove the lid and bake for an additional 23 – 25 minutes (25 minutes if you like a darker and crispier bread)
  • Transfer to a wire rack and let cool for at least 30 minutes.
  • Serve with a big smear of butter or hummus and enjoy!

🪄 Tips and Tricks

  • When you are performing the stretch and folds, wet your hands so the dough doesn’t stick to them.
  • Don’t overly flour your work surface when shaping the dough, or you won’t be able to create proper tension because there will be no “stick”.

🗒 Variations

Stuffed Sourdough is my niche, I wrote a whole book full of recipes. There are so many ways to make sourdough different and delicious.

You can also leave the inclusions out entirely and this is my normal beginner artisan loaf.

  • Beginner Sourdough Loaf
  • Walnut and Cranberry Loaf


🗒 Substitutions

You can substitute the all-purpose flour for bread flour.

Bread flour has a higher protein content so if you want to substitute a 1:1 ratio for the flour, I would add 20 – 25 grams more of water to make it slightly more hydrated.


🗒 Best served

  • As a side to a savory dinner
  • Dipped in hummus.
  • Smeared with butter.

👝 How to Store Leftovers

Store your leftover bread in a brown paper bag (or Ziplock) and place into a bread box to maximize freshness.

🤔 Common Questions

Can I Freeze This Sourdough Loaf?

Yes! After baking, let the bread cool completely. Then cut into even slices and place into a Ziplock bag and into the freezer until you’re ready to enjoy again!

Sourdough loaf stuffed with roasted garlic and olives.
5 from 1 vote

Roasted Garlic and Olive Sourdough Loaf

Print Recipe
A savory sourdough loaf stuffed with roasted garlic and green olives; this recipe makes two loaves because it's so good you'll want it twice.
Prep Time:4 hours
Cook Time:50 minutes
Fermenting:12 hours
Total Time:16 hours 50 minutes

Equipment

  • 1 dough whisk
  • 1 food scale
  • 1 dutch oven
  • 1 bread lame
  • 2 proofing baskets/ bannetons

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup garlic cloves 25-30 cloves
  • 25 grams roasted garlic oil
  • 1 -2 cups green olives roughly chopped
  • 200 grams bubbly, active sourdough starter
  • 700 grams room temperature water
  • 1,000 grams all-purpose flour
  • 18 grams salt

Instructions

  • In the morning, feed your sourdough starter.

Prepping the Garlic

  • In the afternoon (a couple hours before you assemble your dough) roast the garlic. Preheat your oven to 275 degrees. Transfer your garlic cloves into a small oven safe dish and pour in olive oil until the garlic cloves are just covered.
  • Roast in the oven for one hour, or if you like a darker more fragrant garlic, you can roast them for up to two hours but be careful not to burn them. When the garlic is done roasting, let it cool completely while you assemble your dough.

Assemble your Dough

  • Mix together your bubbly starter and water until the starter has completely dissolved and it turns into a milky liquid. Add in your flour, the oil from the roasted garlic, and salt, and mix until you get a shaggy dough. Cover and let rest for one hour.
  • After resting, work your dough into a semi – smooth ball by pulling the sides of the dough up and towards the middle, rotating the bowl each time. Cover and let rest for one hour.
  • Perform 2 -3 more stretch and folds, every 30 minutes to one hour apart.
  • On the last stretch and fold, laminate your dough by transferring it to a slightly floured surface and stretching it into a large rectangle as far as you can without tearing the dough.
  • Distribute 3/4 the garlic and olives over the entire surface of the dough. Fold the edges of the dough towards the center and add in the remaining garlic and olives. Fold again and shape the dough into a ball. Transfer the dough ball back into the bowl and cover with a damp bowl cover or tea towel. Leave the dough on the counter overnight to bulk ferment.

The Next Morning

  • Turn the dough over onto a lightly floured surface. Split into two equal sized pieces and shape to the proper size of your banneton. (Boule = round shape, Batard = oval shape). Place seam side up in your floured banneton, cover with plastic wrap and place into your fridge for at least two hours or up to three days.

Baking

  • When you're ready to bake your dough, preheat a for Dutch oven at 450 for at least 20 minutes.
  • Remove the dough from the fridge and turn it over onto a bread mat or piece of parchment paper. Using a sharp razor, score the top of the dough by making one large slash down the middle from the top, all the way to the bottom of the dough.
  • Carefully place the dough into a hot, preheated Dutch oven. Cover with the lid and bake for 23 minutes. Remove the lid and bake for an additional 23 – 25 minutes. (25 minutes if you like a darker and crispier artisan bread).
  • Transfer to a wire rack and let cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing.
  • Serve with a big smear of butter and enjoy!

Notes

This recipe makes two loaves. So if you have two Dutch ovens, you can bake both at the same time.. or you can keep one loaf of in the fridge to bake and enjoy later in the week. 

Nutrition

Calories: 42kcal | Carbohydrates: 3g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 3g | Saturated Fat: 0.5g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.3g | Monounsaturated Fat: 3g | Sodium: 1515mg | Potassium: 33mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 0.2g | Vitamin A: 89IU | Vitamin C: 2mg | Calcium: 23mg | Iron: 0.2mg
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Sourdough, Sourdough Bread
Servings: 6
Calories: 42kcal

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4 Comments

  1. I have a question about the garlic cloves….are they whole and intact? I roast garlic regularly – the entire head, drizzled with oil, covered with tin foil, and then you can just smoosh (is that a word) the garlic out (creamy-like)…is that the way it’s meant to be?? Or entire cloves??

    This is the approach that I use for roasted garlic : https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/roasted_garlic/

  2. If I leave out the olives and add some Asiago cheese instead, would it change the amount of starter? I notice that the starter is the only difference in your base recipe.